sarabande:

Issey Miyake F/W 2014 

"I was inspired by forests and beautiful art created by trees, roots and nature so actually this was for the beginning of the show so I had a short performance, it is a very conceptual part so I have a new innovation with ringed pleats, there are very dynamically shaped dresses and jackets and shirts so all writing can be transformed into compact circular shapes on a flat surface so it is a very new idea in this collection.This is a new fabric, so we use very high-tech computers and techniques to weave these clothes so if you iron them, they shrink very quickly before becoming dresses." - Yoshiyuki Miyamae

(Source: vogueanon)

Posted at 3:39pm.

So all we need to do to be featured on the cover of Vogue is make a sex tape, run some pretentious tv show, had a marriage with some basketball guy faster than you can say “indiana jones”, and last but not least—run to a tacky rapper guy who like to pull off the Margiela mask burglar look.

Posted at 3:30am.

'The Mechanical Man of the Moon,' a short film accompanying the editorial entitled as 'Like a Warrior' featuring Mariacarla Boscono, photographed by Tim Walker for Vogue Italia March 2014

View the film and the complete editorial here

Posted at 3:26am.

bitemagazine:


BITE Magazine Issue 08 | SYNERGY

SYNERGY: DESIRE, NECESSITY AND SUSTAINABILITY

There is no point in making a commitment to ethical sourcing if nobody wants to buy the clothes. You could do all the good in the world, fill the racks with good intentions, but if there are no sales then there is no future. Julie Gilhart, formerly fashion director at Barneys New York, and an early supporter of sustainable fashion, states: “Consumers respond to good design. Design and desirability must come first.” Good intentions must be met with good product.

The fashion industry needs to discuss the synergy between supply and demand, how sustainability can lead to prosperity, and that even the smallest business decisions can have a huge ripple effect. Perhaps what’s most important is figuring out what we are trying to sustain: technique, resource, product, or profit? Perhaps it’s all of the above. This conversation is urgent because retreating into our bubble of denial is clearly not working.

And then there’s the little steps that you and I can make to be more conscientious consumers. It doesn’t make sense to stop buying cheap clothes completely as that would sever garment workers’ only source of income. On the other hand, when we buy cheap clothing at such an alarming rate we only increase the demand, leading to over-exhausted garment workers, over-crowded factories, and, in the most desperate cases, another building collapse.

Buy local. Buy less. Buy slower. The next time you’re shopping for a shirt or a dress think about why you’re making that purchase: is it because you want it, or do you truly need it? Is there something already hanging in your closet that never sees the light of day? Why not wear that instead?

Text: Hung Tran

READ THE ISSUE IN FULL ON ISSUU OR IN FULL SCREEN.

BOTH DIGITAL AND PRINT EDITIONS ARE AVAILABLE VIA MAGCLOUD.

Posted at 8:02pm.

bitemagazine:

BITE Magazine Issue 08 | SYNERGY


SYNERGY: DESIRE, NECESSITY AND SUSTAINABILITY
There is no point in making a commitment to ethical sourcing if nobody wants to buy the clothes. You could do all the good in the world, fill the racks with good intentions, but if there are no sales then there is no future. Julie Gilhart, formerly fashion director at Barneys New York, and an early supporter of sustainable fashion, states: “Consumers respond to good design. Design and desirability must come first.” Good intentions must be met with good product.

The fashion industry needs to discuss the synergy between supply and demand, how sustainability can lead to prosperity, and that even the smallest business decisions can have a huge ripple effect. Perhaps what’s most important is figuring out what we are trying to sustain: technique, resource, product, or profit? Perhaps it’s all of the above. This conversation is urgent because retreating into our bubble of denial is clearly not working.
And then there’s the little steps that you and I can make to be more conscientious consumers. It doesn’t make sense to stop buying cheap clothes completely as that would sever garment workers’ only source of income. On the other hand, when we buy cheap clothing at such an alarming rate we only increase the demand, leading to over-exhausted garment workers, over-crowded factories, and, in the most desperate cases, another building collapse. 
Buy local. Buy less. Buy slower. The next time you’re shopping for a shirt or a dress think about why you’re making that purchase: is it because you want it, or do you truly need it? Is there something already hanging in your closet that never sees the light of day? Why not wear that instead?
Text: Hung Tran

READ THE ISSUE IN FULL ON ISSUU OR IN FULL SCREEN.
BOTH DIGITAL AND PRINT EDITIONS ARE AVAILABLE VIA MAGCLOUD.

Models wearing red contact lenses with elaborate crowns constructed from braids, adorned with exquisite jewelry (made by Katsuya Kamo) at Undercover F/W 2014

Posted at 2:18am.

sarabande:

Soo Joo Park suspended in a giant Ziploc bag designed by Lawrence Malstaf, at Iris Van Herpen F/W 2014

"In the recent past, patents on our genes have been purchased. Are we still the sole proprietor of our bodies? From this question arises a sense of arrested freedom in one’s most intimate, solitary state. Models float in the air, embryonic, seemingly weightless and in a meditative suspended animation. Metamorphosis is suggested through intricate enmeshing of materials. Imprisoned fire opal beads gleam through lacerated weaves, artificial fibers compose voluminous, architectural structures, the organic ripple of light on water." - The show description via

Posted at 11:32pm.

An excerpt from Fashion: A Philosophy by Lars Svendsen

"There is hardly such a thing as critical fashion journalism". In this paragraph Lars Svendsen highlight the relation between fashion journalism and fashion status that barely recognised as a form of art.

"An important reason for fashion not having attained the same recognitions as other forms of art is there are traditions for serious criticism within visual arts, music, literature and film, while this is almost totally absent from fashion."

And i find that sentence as an honest truth. Some of fashion’s biggest publications are a bunch of glossy advertising book with pretty dresses and pretty faces on it. I can hardly point out a relevant article on Vogue, they rather put an article about how effective it was to put your obese 7 years old on a diet. While The Rolling Stones magazine, would dare to write something like “Criminals with a license to shoot shit into our ear drums.” about electronic dance music and DJs.

It’s a never-ending quandary for fashion press: criticize a designer’s work, and you can forget about an invitation to the next show. Gush about it, and lose your integrity. It’s a damned if you do and damned if you don’t — some writers would consider themselves lucky that a negative review only cost them a seat, instead of costing their employer thousands of dollars in advertising revenue.

There are only a handful of fashion reviewers who give real reviews and they’re dropping like flies lately. All we’re left with now is people dressed in silly seasonal uniforms presenting themselves as journalists in order to use means of communication as a public way to strengthen their social network and pave their way up, via compliments, clapping like fools and not questioning a single thing that hits their eye.

As Grace Coddington puts it, "Any old shit can go down the runway and they all sit there and clap"

Posted at 11:13pm and tagged with: opinion, fashion journalism, fashion, grace coddington, Lars Svendsten,.

An excerpt from Fashion: A Philosophy by Lars Svendsen

"There is hardly such a thing as critical fashion journalism". In this paragraph Lars Svendsen highlight the relation between fashion journalism and fashion status that barely recognised as a form of art.

"An important reason for fashion not having attained the same recognitions as other forms of art is there are traditions for serious criticism within visual arts, music, literature and film, while this is almost totally absent from fashion."

And i find that sentence as an honest truth. Some of fashion’s biggest publications are a bunch of glossy advertising book with pretty dresses and pretty faces on it. I can hardly point out a relevant article on Vogue, they rather put an article about how effective it was to put your obese 7 years old on a diet. While The Rolling Stones magazine, would dare to write something like “Criminals with a license to shoot shit into our ear drums.” about electronic dance music and DJs.

It’s a never-ending quandary for fashion press: criticize a designer’s work, and you can forget about an invitation to the next show. Gush about it, and lose your integrity. It’s a damned if you do and damned if you don’t — some writers would consider themselves lucky that a negative review only cost them a seat, instead of costing their employer thousands of dollars in advertising revenue.

There are only a handful of fashion reviewers who give real reviews and they’re dropping like flies lately. All we’re left with now is people dressed in silly seasonal uniforms presenting themselves as journalists in order to use means of communication as a public way to strengthen their social network and pave their way up, via compliments, clapping like fools and not questioning a single thing that hits their eye. 

As Grace Coddington puts it, "Any old shit can go down the runway and they all sit there and clap"

Chanel Spring/Summer 2014 Haute Couture


The set of a Chanel show is the gold standard of fashion excess: icebergs, forests, the world after the world has ended…nothing is too much for Karl Lagerfeld. The set for today’s couture presentation gave nothing away—an enormous glistening white tube loomed center stage, so blank that its only possible promise was revolution. And revolve it duly did. When it revolved, it revealed shaggy French pop star Sébastien Tellier, his orchestra, and two giant sweeping staircases fresh out of an Art Deco fantasia from the Hollywood thirties. No, Lagerfeld corrected, “It’s an ice palace, a nightclub on another planet.”

He knew those stairs, the kind of stairs down which vedettes would make a grand entrance, posing every step of the way. Couture stairs. So he had his models sprint down them, as light as fairies, skipping and spinning. It was an adorably spritely fuck you to any notion of heritage. And yet Lagerfeld also strapped his fey young things into corsets with stays, the very thing that Coco herself cast off in the name of modernity nearly a century ago. He compared them to motocross belts. “This is ballroom-cross,” he joked. Laughter aside, the supreme irony of corseting a Chanel woman was surely not lost on smart cookie Karl.

Anyway, the corseted midriff was the core over which he laid a bolero (or crop top) and a short skirt for the collection’s defining look. It was energetic, athletic…and it was really the only thing that could successfully match the footwear. Every outfit featured a couture sneaker by Massaro: python, with lace, pearls, and tweed. (If you’re curious about the cost of such an item, the price tag will probably be something in the vicinity of €3,000.)

In the spirit of sportiness, there were also knee and elbow pads, and there was athletic-wear transfigured: A crystallized blouson was one of the prettiest pieces in the collection. In fact, the luminescence of the trim, lively clothing seemed doubly noteworthy, given that yesterday’s Dior Couture show was also about light and movement. The two most significant fashion houses in France just made a major commitment to a new generation…to the future, in fact.

—Tim Blanks

Posted at 2:44pm and tagged with: Chanel, chanel haute couture, haute couture, devon windsor, karl lagerfeld, fashion, fashion illustration,.

Chanel Spring/Summer 2014 Haute Couture

The set of a Chanel show is the gold standard of fashion excess: icebergs, forests, the world after the world has ended…nothing is too much for Karl Lagerfeld. The set for today’s couture presentation gave nothing away—an enormous glistening white tube loomed center stage, so blank that its only possible promise was revolution. And revolve it duly did. When it revolved, it revealed shaggy French pop star Sébastien Tellier, his orchestra, and two giant sweeping staircases fresh out of an Art Deco fantasia from the Hollywood thirties. No, Lagerfeld corrected, “It’s an ice palace, a nightclub on another planet.” 

He knew those stairs, the kind of stairs down which vedettes would make a grand entrance, posing every step of the way. Couture stairs. So he had his models sprint down them, as light as fairies, skipping and spinning. It was an adorably spritely fuck you to any notion of heritage. And yet Lagerfeld also strapped his fey young things into corsets with stays, the very thing that Coco herself cast off in the name of modernity nearly a century ago. He compared them to motocross belts. “This is ballroom-cross,” he joked. Laughter aside, the supreme irony of corseting a Chanel woman was surely not lost on smart cookie Karl. 

Anyway, the corseted midriff was the core over which he laid a bolero (or crop top) and a short skirt for the collection’s defining look. It was energetic, athletic…and it was really the only thing that could successfully match the footwear. Every outfit featured a couture sneaker by Massaro: python, with lace, pearls, and tweed. (If you’re curious about the cost of such an item, the price tag will probably be something in the vicinity of €3,000.) 

In the spirit of sportiness, there were also knee and elbow pads, and there was athletic-wear transfigured: A crystallized blouson was one of the prettiest pieces in the collection. In fact, the luminescence of the trim, lively clothing seemed doubly noteworthy, given that yesterday’s Dior Couture show was also about light and movement. The two most significant fashion houses in France just made a major commitment to a new generation…to the future, in fact.

—Tim Blanks

One day at IMG I am interviewing Sasha. She is 22. Grew up in Moscow. One gets the sense that, more than others’, her life has been utterly transformed by modeling. She is so nervous about being interviewed-partly, I think, because her English is not so good- that she has printed out a list of questions that I sent her agent so that she could be prepared. She wrote her answers out on the paper, and now she is reading them aloud to me, her hands trembling. I have to fight the urge to hug her. But all of the nerves disappear in an instant when I throw her a question that isn’t on the printout. Do you want to be a supermodel? I ask. She looks at me with that face and stares out from those Prada ads and says in her thick accent, “In Rrrussia, vee have proverb: Only bad soldiers don’t vant to be general.”
— an excerpt from “Hit Girls”, Vogue US May 2007 by Jonathan Van Meter

Happy birthday the one and only, Alekcandra “Sasha” Igorevna Pivovarova

(Source: fashiognosis)

Posted at 10:20pm.

“One day at IMG I am interviewing Sasha. She is 22. Grew up in Moscow. One gets the sense that, more than others’, her life has been utterly transformed by modeling. She is so nervous about being interviewed-partly, I think, because her English is not so good- that she has printed out a list of questions that I sent her agent so that she could be prepared. She wrote her answers out on the paper, and now she is reading them aloud to me, her hands trembling. I have to fight the urge to hug her. But all of the nerves disappear in an instant when I throw her a question that isn’t on the printout. Do you want to be a supermodel? I ask. She looks at me with that face and stares out from those Prada ads and says in her thick accent, “In Rrrussia, vee have proverb: Only bad soldiers don’t vant to be general.””
— an excerpt from “Hit Girls”, Vogue US May 2007 by Jonathan Van Meter

Happy birthday the one and only, Alekcandra “Sasha” Igorevna Pivovarova

I. AM. CRACKING.

Posted at 1:02am and tagged with: snejana onopka,.

Among the most talked about incidences in recent history is Raf simons now at the helm of the house of Christian Dior & made his debut on the runways of paris for the FW12 couture season. It was as if everyone in fashion had been holding their breath. There has been so much speculation during the last year about whether or not this was even a reality.

Raf’s collection was minimal. Raf’s collection IS minimal. the art of haute couture- not often associated with minimalism. i think we, as a grouping of fashion spectators have become desensitized by the imaginative theatricality of john galliano. as W Magazine’s Edward Enninful made public his thoughts of Dior’s previous director he spoke, “thinking of John Gallinao today, talk about setting the bar high”. With that energy being cast into the air, one couldn’t help but admit that the golden age of Christian Dior is, tragically, over. I won’t sit in disappointment thinking that there can’t be another great era for the label, but in seeing this collection, the level of design which is being produced pales in comparison to the work of galliano. I hate to admit it, but of course, comparison is always inevitable, particularly in subject of fashion. It’s simply impossible.

That said, there seems to be a goal to re-establish what & who this dior woman is, in our modern times as Raf said. Some of the collections pieces contained extravagant beading which is often associated with the art of couture craftsmanship but still, the clothes are boring. And these are not just clothes, but couture. that is exactly what Raf always showed- clothes. this was most certainly not couture. from vision to cohesion, or lack there of- much of this collection was wrong, not up to par & is far too simple to properly introduce this new era of Christian Dior which we have all been waiting for. most of us are thinking, “this is how you replace Galliano?” – looking at how subtle these clothes are, i get it- the house of Christian Dior has been built on soft, feminine sophistication but in the same regard, John Galliano elevated the house of Christian Dior to violent elegance & explosive glamour- it was a show you came to see when you were at christian dior during couture season. seemingly, everything that the label & what we’ve come to define as dior under the direction of Galliano has been stripped to practically nothing. The Dior we know has seemingly been reduced to minimalism & couture accents rather than full on haute-make-you-grab-your-fucking-chest-and-gasp-for-air-couture.

I’m not saying that the collection is bad, in fact it’s good- but maybe that’s the problem. With a house like Christian Dior & all the glamour of the house legacy- we don’t want good, we want fucking great. Where is the glamour? There was no allure, there was no theatricality, no spark & no sense of excitement in the collection that made you say to yourself, “this. is. fashion.” – of the looks that were presented, you were left wanting more & not in a ‘this is too good’ type of hunger but a longing the sense of, “that’s it?” I would rather have had 5 amazing looks that can live up to the Dior couture standard, rather than seeing plenty of watered down gowns with no embellishment, no show stopping elements. When thinking of other collections that will be presented this couture season, i wonder- where is the house going? What direction are they taking? I’m all for simplifications but i understand the demands for drama, the thirst for theatricality & the calling out for true couture. We’re looking for couture that fucks with our brains & makes us ask ourselves- “how does beauty this intense even exist?” – we did not find that here & im fearful of when we will, ever again with the house of Christian Dior.

Posted at 11:50pm and tagged with: Dior, dior haute couture, haute couture, raf simons, john galliano, fashion, opinion,.

Atelier Versace Spring/Summer 2014

Picture Grace Jones in one of her iconic hoods. That’s what Donatella Versace did as she was designing her new Atelier Versace collection. “She left a sign as a strong, powerful woman, a power goddess,” Versace said of Jones before the show. “I wanted to embody that.” Versace set about her glam salute by combining the body-con silhouettes that are essential to the house DNA with more fluid draping.

Fashion is trending toward easier, more relaxed silhouettes at the moment, and Donatella may be keying into that, but if her designs here were liberated, they were fierce in a way that will be familiar to the label’s followers. Take the opening tailleur. The skirt was draped black silk jersey studded with a grid of Swarovski crystals, but the jacket was as structured as a suit of armor, its rhinestone-embroidered hood conjuring Ingrid Bergman as Joan of Arc as much as it did Jones.

As it happens, Azzedine Alaïa, the man who first put Jones in a hooded dress, was watching in the audience tonight. But this collection was all Donatella, with the anatomical seaming on cocktail dresses picked out in stone and outlined in tiny metal chains, and geometric back cutouts flanking a lacing detail that ran up the spine. Graphic tattoo motifs were stitched in crystals onto the sheer tulle of a top worn with a very un-Versace voluminous ball skirt. “Tattoos are a new form of art, a less elitist one that everybody knows,” said Donatella of the impulse. Other embellishments were more understated, or if not understated, at least more personal. Donatella certainly relished pointing out the cropped black Perfecto that closed the show. Made from tiny pieces of leather sewn onto georgette, the jacket weighed next to nothing, a feat only a couture atelier could pull off. It was the signal achievement of the collection, and there were certain elements in the crowd that would’ve liked to see more along those lines.

In the end, though, it will be the flash and bang of slinky red-carpet numbers in acid green, orange, and purple, their corset waists embroidered in glass beads, with bare legs flashing, that will provide the collection’s most-tweeted images.
—Nicole Phelps

Posted at 1:09pm and tagged with: Versace, atelier versace, fashion illustration, fashion, haute couture, sketch,.

Atelier Versace Spring/Summer 2014

Picture Grace Jones in one of her iconic hoods. That’s what Donatella Versace did as she was designing her new Atelier Versace collection. “She left a sign as a strong, powerful woman, a power goddess,” Versace said of Jones before the show. “I wanted to embody that.” Versace set about her glam salute by combining the body-con silhouettes that are essential to the house DNA with more fluid draping.

Fashion is trending toward easier, more relaxed silhouettes at the moment, and Donatella may be keying into that, but if her designs here were liberated, they were fierce in a way that will be familiar to the label’s followers. Take the opening tailleur. The skirt was draped black silk jersey studded with a grid of Swarovski crystals, but the jacket was as structured as a suit of armor, its rhinestone-embroidered hood conjuring Ingrid Bergman as Joan of Arc as much as it did Jones.

As it happens, Azzedine Alaïa, the man who first put Jones in a hooded dress, was watching in the audience tonight. But this collection was all Donatella, with the anatomical seaming on cocktail dresses picked out in stone and outlined in tiny metal chains, and geometric back cutouts flanking a lacing detail that ran up the spine. Graphic tattoo motifs were stitched in crystals onto the sheer tulle of a top worn with a very un-Versace voluminous ball skirt. “Tattoos are a new form of art, a less elitist one that everybody knows,” said Donatella of the impulse. Other embellishments were more understated, or if not understated, at least more personal. Donatella certainly relished pointing out the cropped black Perfecto that closed the show. Made from tiny pieces of leather sewn onto georgette, the jacket weighed next to nothing, a feat only a couture atelier could pull off. It was the signal achievement of the collection, and there were certain elements in the crowd that would’ve liked to see more along those lines.

In the end, though, it will be the flash and bang of slinky red-carpet numbers in acid green, orange, and purple, their corset waists embroidered in glass beads, with bare legs flashing, that will provide the collection’s most-tweeted images.
—Nicole Phelps

supermodelgif:

Mariacarla Boscono at Givenchy Menswear F/W 2014

Wow, Yes.

(Source: vuittonv)

Posted at 11:29am.

I read about your answer regarding the future career you want to pursue in fashion. Why would you prefer to make your own country's fashion scene to be recognised by the global fashion industry, rather than break into the global scene itself? I mean, isn't it everyone who pursue fashion ever dreamed about?
Anonymous

Of course. I bet no one here never dreamed about being invited, attends, sit tightly in a Balenciaga show, or actually travel to NY-London-Milan-Paris to attend those world’s fashion capitals fashion week, or getting a job in some major fashion publication group like Condè Nast, or be able to show your designs/collections in the world’s fashion capitals, socializing with the most important people in the industry, let me make it short—to be actually break into the fashion industry.

I’m sure no one never dreamed about it. Including me. Everyone got to start somewhere. For Giorgio Armani, being a window dresser at a department store. For Imran Amed (EIC of BoF), starting a small website from his home PC. For Steven Meisel, lied about being Avedon’s secretary, being an illustrator just to be allowed to photographs the girls he admires. And as for me, my own country’s fashion scene.

The thing that would never European/American people could ever imagined is being someone who lives in the other part of the world where fashion considered as something unimportant— in the fashion industry means you have to work 1000x harder, to offer what doesn’t exist yet in the mainstream industry. Do you think you can be worldwide recognised photographer by just photographing people in some random cities in Asia? No. You have to pack your bag, travel, knock on the door, offer them what you got. But of course, we live in the 21st century where distance means nothing. We have the internet. That’s why i choose to make an online database, a website that even some girl in North Pole could access.

And of course, i’ve said it before and i’ll say it again. You can make it happen when you start to get off your chair and your monitor, actually make something, fucking collaborate, fucking network, fucking contribute, start to ask everywhere, send your CVs everywhere, because hey—no one knows who will say yes.

Posted at 6:36pm.